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Extensions Engadged


Scottly
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I have setup axon server and have 4 extensions 101->104. I can dial out via Voip service from any extension, however, if I try and call Ext 103 from Ext 102 (for example) it gives half a ring tone and then flicks to an engaged signal - Ext 103 is not actually busy and does not ring.

 

In the Axon log it reports this:

 

22:58:39 Call 102 -> sip:103@192.168.0.20

22.58.55 Error Returned: 404 Not Found

22.58.22 Call 102->sip:103@192.168.0.20

 

Seems I have something configured incorrectly.. but can not spot it after reviewing doco?

 

Any help appreciated.

 

Regards,

Scott

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This simply means that when taking into consideration the dialing plan, the number "103" doesn't go anywhere. Even though you may have a "103" extension, lets say in your dialling plan you have it set to call on your voip line as the default line for all numbers, then it will probably try and phone out 103 on to your voip line, and your voip service will simply send an error back saying that isn't a valid number / not found.

 

Typically these are two common setups used in business/soho voip networks to workaround this:

 

1) Set up the dialing plan so that dialed numbers that are prefixed with a special code (eg 0 or 9) are dialed on the external voip line, and all other numbers are assumed to be internal.

 

Pros:

- Lines are clearly separate, pick which line to dial on approach, system not confused about which line to dial on.

Cons:

- Guests and new users to the system will have to be instructed on how to 'dial out'.

- Could confuse people in emergencies preventing them from contacting an emergency response centre (eg dialing 000 instead of 0 000 or 911 instead of 9 911)

- Annoyance, Inconvenience (users may forget the to add the prefix number at first and it may take getting used to)

 

2) The way I use

Find a digit which no external calls should start with (for example, where I live, there are no local numbers or area codes starting with the digit 2). Assign all calls prefixed with that number to be dialed on the internal line, all other calls go on the external line by default.

 

Pros:

- Normal dialing as with any common PSTN line, no need to 'dial out'

- No confusion in crucial situations such as emergencies or with guests

- You can tell users their extension numbers with the digit prefix included. This way when they are dialing, they will not need to remember the prefix, but rather the whole number like '2198' even though the actual extension is 198

Cons:

- Works on the assumption that external calls will not start with the chosen digit, otherwise users may try to call a number (eg 2123 4567) but find it won't go through because it is trying to look for it as an internal extension

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Thanks for that - all sorted.

 

This simply means that when taking into consideration the dialing plan, the number "103" doesn't go anywhere. Even though you may have a "103" extension, lets say in your dialling plan you have it set to call on your voip line as the default line for all numbers, then it will probably try and phone out 103 on to your voip line, and your voip service will simply send an error back saying that isn't a valid number / not found.

 

Typically these are two common setups used in business/soho voip networks to workaround this:

 

1) Set up the dialing plan so that dialed numbers that are prefixed with a special code (eg 0 or 9) are dialed on the external voip line, and all other numbers are assumed to be internal.

 

Pros:

- Lines are clearly separate, pick which line to dial on approach, system not confused about which line to dial on.

Cons:

- Guests and new users to the system will have to be instructed on how to 'dial out'.

- Could confuse people in emergencies preventing them from contacting an emergency response centre (eg dialing 000 instead of 0 000 or 911 instead of 9 911)

- Annoyance, Inconvenience (users may forget the to add the prefix number at first and it may take getting used to)

 

2) The way I use

Find a digit which no external calls should start with (for example, where I live, there are no local numbers or area codes starting with the digit 2). Assign all calls prefixed with that number to be dialed on the internal line, all other calls go on the external line by default.

 

Pros:

- Normal dialing as with any common PSTN line, no need to 'dial out'

- No confusion in crucial situations such as emergencies or with guests

- You can tell users their extension numbers with the digit prefix included. This way when they are dialing, they will not need to remember the prefix, but rather the whole number like '2198' even though the actual extension is 198

Cons:

- Works on the assumption that external calls will not start with the chosen digit, otherwise users may try to call a number (eg 2123 4567) but find it won't go through because it is trying to look for it as an internal extension

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Thanks for that - all sorted.

 

This simply means that when taking into consideration the dialing plan, the number "103" doesn't go anywhere. Even though you may have a "103" extension, lets say in your dialling plan you have it set to call on your voip line as the default line for all numbers, then it will probably try and phone out 103 on to your voip line, and your voip service will simply send an error back saying that isn't a valid number / not found.

 

Typically these are two common setups used in business/soho voip networks to workaround this:

 

1) Set up the dialing plan so that dialed numbers that are prefixed with a special code (eg 0 or 9) are dialed on the external voip line, and all other numbers are assumed to be internal.

 

Pros:

- Lines are clearly separate, pick which line to dial on approach, system not confused about which line to dial on.

Cons:

- Guests and new users to the system will have to be instructed on how to 'dial out'.

- Could confuse people in emergencies preventing them from contacting an emergency response centre (eg dialing 000 instead of 0 000 or 911 instead of 9 911)

- Annoyance, Inconvenience (users may forget the to add the prefix number at first and it may take getting used to)

 

2) The way I use

Find a digit which no external calls should start with (for example, where I live, there are no local numbers or area codes starting with the digit 2). Assign all calls prefixed with that number to be dialed on the internal line, all other calls go on the external line by default.

 

Pros:

- Normal dialing as with any common PSTN line, no need to 'dial out'

- No confusion in crucial situations such as emergencies or with guests

- You can tell users their extension numbers with the digit prefix included. This way when they are dialing, they will not need to remember the prefix, but rather the whole number like '2198' even though the actual extension is 198

Cons:

- Works on the assumption that external calls will not start with the chosen digit, otherwise users may try to call a number (eg 2123 4567) but find it won't go through because it is trying to look for it as an internal extension

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