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danpetitpas

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About danpetitpas

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  1. danpetitpas

    Opening audio file failed

    There are many flavors of .WAV files. We've been getting some compressed .WAVs from some of our clients who use digital recorders. I use Goldwave or WavePad to convert them to PCM 16-bit .WAVs.
  2. I needed to insert timestamps into various interviews we transcribe, so I Googled this topic and came up with a wide variety of people trying to write Word macros and various work-arounds (such as typing CRTL+T, ALT+TAB, CTRL+V, ALT+TAB, etc.) to insert time stamps. However, I found the easiest way was already built into Express Scribe. To insert timestamps into a Word document, in Express Scribe go to Settings, then select Pedals and Hot Keys. Click Add at the bottom of the box to create a System-wide Hot Key. A Window pops up asking you to press a key. In my version of Express Scribe F1 and F11 are free. I chose F1. Then a Select Command box pops up. Scroll down to Copy Time and select this. Now, as you play the audio file in Express Scribe, all you have to do is press your Hot Key (F1 for me) at the point where you hear the word you want to time stamp, and then CTRL V to paste it in Word. Bingo. Two keystrokes and you're pasting timestamps! And it's a system-wide hot key, so you can insert timestamps into anything.
  3. danpetitpas

    Insert express scribe timestamp using word macro

    I think someone's playing with us. Why not just post the Macro instead of having people supply their e-mail addresses? Sounds like a scam. In any event, to insert timestamps into a Word document, in Express Scribe go to Settings, then select Pedals and Hot Keys. Click Add at the bottom of the box to create a System-wide Hot Key. A Window pops up asking you to press a key. In my version of Express Scribe F1 and F11 are free. I chose F1. Then a Select Command box pops up. Scroll down to Copy Time and select this. Now, as you play the audio file in Express Scribe, all you have to do is press your Hot Key (F1 for me) at the point where you hear the word you want to time stamp, and then CTRL V to paste it in Word. Bingo. Two keystrokes and you're pasting timestamps!
  4. danpetitpas

    2 microphones?

    I think your best bet is to buy a microphone mixer and plug that into your mic or line in. If you do a search for Rolls mic mixers, you will see all kinds of different small, portable mic mixers. Mix the two mics together and record the feed. If you want to get fancy, you can get a stereo mixer. Radio Shack has a $30 mixer that handles 4 mics or 2 mics and a stereo line input. As for keeping one mic from bleeding over to another mic, you need to do what they do in a recording studio by using sound-absorbing material between the two narrators. You can use foam from an old futon mattress, or pillows, or thick curtains, etc. Good luck.
  5. DAF appears to be an old Shockwave file format. You can use Google to look for a DAF format converter. I found one called XChange File Converter from PCSTools.com.
  6. Well, you already know you don't have compatible systems. I would suggest that you convert the CDs to MP3 files. There are plenty of rippers you can find online, some free and some paid. I use an old versions of MusicMatch to convert to MP3s. Both MACs and PCs can play back MP3s. Don't use iTunes to do this. There's no DRM on MP3s. As for the video, Apple TV requires the H.264 MPEG4 format. Now, PCs and XBoxes can play these files. QuickTime would be the easiest way to encode them and be compatible on all platforms. Likewise, record your LPs as WAVs on your computer. Then you can burn individual Audio CDs, if you like, or convert them to MP3s. I use Goldwave and WavePad to do this. Both programs will also convert audio files to MP3s. So that would be your answer. Buy Quicktime Pro for video encoding and either Goldwave or WavePad for audio recording and MP3 encoding.
  7. You have to convert the files to CDA files (CD Audio files). Most CD burning software has this built into it. You have to select "Burn a music CD" or "Audio CD for car or home" when making the disks. Then you drag the files in and the software will convert them into proper audio CD files as it burns the CD. You can't have more than 72-80 minutes of audio no matter how the files were recorded or encoded. All audio files are converted into stereo 44,100 Hz PCM files which all CD players will recognize. Older players can't recognize data CDs with MP3s or WAVs on them as newer players can.
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